ISSN: 0034-8376
eISSN: 2564-8896
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ABSTRACT

Abnormal Cardiovascular Findings in Acute Pancreatitis: Are They Associated with Disease Severity?

VOLUME 69 - NUMBER 6 / November-December (Original Article)  doi: 10.24875/RIC.17002361

Martin A. Chacón-Portillo, Departments of Gastroenterology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico
Gerardo Payró-Ramírez, Cardiolology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico
Mario César Pelaez-Luna, School of Medicine, Research Division, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City; Pancreas Clinic, Gastroenterology Department, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, México
Luis Federico Uscanga-Domínguez, Pancreas Clinic, Gastroenterology Department, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico
Zuilma Vasquéz-Ortiz, Cardiolology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico
Consuelo Orihuela, Cardiolology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico
Sophia E. Martínez-Vázquez, Departments of Gastroenterology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico
Jorge Hernández-Calleros, Pancreas Clinic, Gastroenterology Department, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico

Background: Acute pancreatitis (AP), a disease that commonly requires in-hospital treatment, has been associated with a high incidence of abnormal cardiovascular findings (ACFs). We conducted a prospective study to explore the association of these
findings with severity of the disease. Methods: Adult patients with AP diagnosis were prospectively enrolled in an observational study during an 8-month period in a tertiary care center. AP and its severity were defined according to the Revised Atlanta Classification of AP. Subjects were submitted to electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, and serologic testing during the acute period and a 3-month follow-up. The incidence of ACF was compared between two groups: (1) Mild and (2) moderate/severe cases. Results: Twenty-seven patients (mean age 48 ± 17 years) with AP were enrolled; 15 (55%) had mild and 12 (45%) had moderate/severe AP. During the acute episode, 67% had increased pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels; 52% had abnormal electrocardiographic findings; 48% had abnormal echocardiographic findings; and 18% had increased troponin I levels. There was no significant difference in the incidence of ACF between mild and moderate/severe groups. Nineteen patients (70%) had repeated follow-up testing, and most of the initial ACF did not persist. Conclusion: ACFs occur in an important proportion of patients during AP episodes. Future research should continue to focus in the association of ACFs and the severity of the disease.

Keywords: Acute pancreatitis. Severity. Electrocardiography. Echocardiography. Organ failure.

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