ISSN: 0034-8376
eISSN: 2564-8896
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ABSTRACT

Rates of Surgical Site Infection in Cholecystectomy: Comparison between a University Teaching Hospital, Madrid Region, Spain, and USA Rates

VOLUME 69 - NUMBER 6 / November-December (Original Article)  doi: 10.24875/RIC.17002197

Gil Rodríguez-Caravaca, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón y Department of Medicine, Surgery, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain
Pablo Gil-Yonte, Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
Juan Antonio Del-Moral-Luque, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, and Department of Medicine, Surgery, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain
Warren Covelé Lucas, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, and Department of Medicine, Surgery, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain
José María Fernández-Cebrián, Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
Manuel Durán-Poveda, Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain

Background: There are many factors that can influence surgical site infections (SSI) in cholecystectomies. Incidence of cholecystectomy SSI was studied and compared with the incidence in Madrid Region, Spain, and the United States. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted which included all patients who underwent gallbladder surgery for 5 consecutive years, at the Alcorcón Foundation University Teaching Hospital. SSI incidence rate was calculated. An association between risk factors and SSI incidence was assessed with the relative risk (RR). Infection rates were compared to those in the Madrid Region and to the overall Spanish and United States rates using the standardized infection ratio (SIR). Results: The study included 1532 patients. Cumulative overall SSI was 1.96% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-2.7). The SIR was 0.89 with respect to the Madrid Region, 0.77 with respect to Spain’s rate, and 1.77 with respect to the United States’ rate. A laparoscopic route protected against infection (RR = 0.43; 95% CI: 0.2-0.9). Razor shaving in surgical preparation, duration of surgery, and neoplasm increased SSI incidence. Conclusions: SSI incidence rates among cholecystectomized patients at our hospital are higher than rates in the United States. A laparoscopic route protected against SSI.

Keywords: Surgical wound infection, Cohort studies, Incidence, Cholecystectomy.

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